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IGERT in Geographic Information Science  Download a PDF of our brochure

Welcome to the University at Buffalo's Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) program in Geographic Information Science. This is a multidisciplinary effort, involving seven academic departments, that is designed to prepare Ph.D students for the varied demands of a career in Geographic Information Science.  

Our program has been revised!
Please click here to go to our new site
(Current Fellows please continue to use this site)

Students take a common core of courses in geography, philosophy, and computer science, while also completing requirements for a Ph.D. in one of eight discipline-based departments: Geography, Philosophy, Civil Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Computer Science, Political Science, Communication (Information Studies) or Anthropology.  By awarding degrees in traditional disciplines, while having an inherently multidisciplinary curriculum, the GI Science Concentration allows students to combine an innovative program of study suited to our rapidly changing world with the solid credentials of an established doctoral degree.

Program participants obtain research training through mentoring, internships, special workshops, and participation in active research programs under six major research themes: cognitive models of geographic space, computational implementations of geographic concepts, geographic information and society, human capital research using GIS, environmental modeling, and regional modeling and optimization. 

Enhanced Fellowships Available! Click here for more information.  

This project is supported by IGERT award DGE-9870668 and DGE-0333417 from the National Science Foundation and by the University at Buffalo. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

 


Copyright © 2000 John Kavanagh, NCGIA